Tag Archives: RGB

Sony PVM 8042-Q: Is it Truly Worth it?

For the past few years, it seems that several in the retro gaming community have begun looking for the best ways to maximize their gaming experience. In an age where modern TVs no longer are retro friendly. Instead, several individuals have begun to look into the past, discovering that maybe those giant CRT TVs have some use after all these years.

For numerous people, it would only seem that the RCA or S-video was the best way to play your classic games since those were the ones plenty grew up with. However, the past few years have proven its time to move onto a format that will require several to rethink about how retro games should be intended to appear, RGB. In general, RGB stands for Red, Green, and Blue and considered by several to be the best format to display your retro systems on. Yet, the issue arises from how to enable this display into your TVs.  There are several manners to achieve RGB but the most common path is to have it displayed from a SCART cable which was only exclusive to Europe. Unfortunately for several Americans, there is no way to plug a scart cable in our TV sets without the use of a converter. For several people, getting all this equipment to optimized for RGB is not something that a multitude of people can afford. In addition, there are some systems that need to be optimized for RGB using soldering skills or having someone do it for you. But for those who can, it’s something that will blow your mind away!

Next, since you’re reading this, I’m assuming you understand that you’re either interesting in knowing more displaying RGB on a TV or curious to observe what it can offer. There are several options for displaying RGB Scart to your TV. An affordable way to display it is by buying an RGB to HDMI or Component/YPBPR converter which may introduce some lag depending on if you plug it into an HD TV or CRT TV that accepts component inputs. Previously, I owned an RGB to Component converter for 2 years and I enjoyed it and it introduced me to RGB’s offerings. Another option is to invest in an XRGB Framemeister or OSSC to display RGB onto your modern television that accept HDMI/Component/VGA signals but these are pricey and recommended with those who have more spending money than others. Finally, the (subjectively speaking) superior way to display is to convert the SCART into BNC towards a professional CRT monitor like a Sony PVM.

After several years of research with additional mass hours of tedious work, I finally decided to sell my SCART to component converter and invest in a Sony PVM 8042Q, part of a line of professional video monitors which several retro gamers consider to be the holy grail of CRT TVs. With its 250 resolution lines, several outputs, including BNC, S-Video, and Composite, and 16:9 option, the 8042Q is a great way to enter the world of the RGB Monitors. At the time, I bought mine for about 80 dollars and one of the best purchases I’ve made.

Following suit, after testing the PVM with my Famicom, Genesis/Mega Drive, Saturn, SNES, PlayStation 1, N64, and Dreamcast I could not complain about the quality of the picture being displayed. There are some issues like it not being able fit the entire image for those 5th generation and Dreamcast due to the screen size limitation and its inability to display 480p which may be in part of when it release time instead of not being able to implement it due to the fact that I would love to play the rest of the 6th Generation in a miniature monitor. Another issue is the fact that it has only mono sound which means that you would need to convert the stereo sound into a mono via an adapter which is not that expensive but still it may annoy some audiophiles.

Overall, my conclusion is that for the price and size, it’s a great entry-level RGB monitor for those interested in entering the world of CRTs. Though prices for RGB monitors have begun to rise over the past few years, there are still chances for fantastic deals online and in person depending on your search for and there are several guides online to help with this journey which I’ll post below.

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